Official Site

Released: 2014

Running Time: 114 mins

Credits

Funding provided by

Press

CITIZENFOUR

Official Site

Released: 2014

Running Time: 73 mins


 

Credits

Evaporating Borders

An essay in five parts, Evaporating Borders offers a series of vignettes, poetically guided by the filmmaker's curious eye and personal reflections. Through the people she encounters along the way, the film dissects the experience of asylum seekers in Cyprus : A PLO activist and exile from Iraq is denied asylum within 15 minutes; neo-nazi fundamentalists roam the streets in an attack on Muslim migrants; activists and academics organize an antifascist rally and clash with the neo-nazis; 195 migrants drown in the Mediterranean.

Writer / Director: Iva Radivojevic

Contact: info@ivaasks.com

 

Official Site

Credits

Director | Producer
Johanna Hamilton

Editor
Gabriel Rhodes

Producers
Marilyn Ness
Katy Chevigny

Cinematographers
Kirsten Johnson
Andreas Burgess (recreations)

Composer
Philip Sheppard

Executive Producers
Julie Goldman
Abigail E. Disney
Gini Reticker

Co-Executive producers
Laura Poitras
Lilly Hartley
Gabriella P. Hearst

 
 
 

1971

The FBI was unaccountable and untouchable until 1971, when a group of ordinary citizens uncovered its illegal domestic spying programs. On March 8, 1971, The Citizens' Commission to Investigate the FBI, as they called themselves, broke into a small FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, took every file, and shared them with the American public.

These actions exposed COINTELPRO, the FBI's illegal surveillance program that involved the intimidation of law-abiding Americans and helped lead to the country's first Congressional investigation of U.S. intelligence agencies.

Never caught, forty-three years later, these everyday Americans – parents, teachers and citizens – publicly reveal themselves for the first time and share their story in the documentary 1971.

Directed by Johanna Hamilton. Produced by Marilyn Ness, Katy Chevigny, and Johanna Hamilton. 

Untitled Surveillance Project (in-progress)

NSA Data Storage Center
Bluffdale, UTAH

Official Site

Released: 2011

Running Time: 101 mins

Awards

Credits

Press

The Law In These Parts

THE LAW IN THESE PARTS explores the four-decade-old Israeli military legal system in the Occupied Territories.  Since Israel conquered the territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip in the 1967 War, the military has imposed thousand of orders and laws, established military courts, sentenced hundreds of thousand of Palestinians, enabled half a million Israeli "settlers" to move to the Occupied Territories and developed a system of long-term jurisdiction by an occupying army that is unique in the world.

THE LAW IN THESE PARTS explores this unprededented and little-known story through testimonies of the military legal professionals who were the archtects of the system and helped run it in its formative years. 

Directed by Ra'anan Alexandrovicz and procuded by Liran Atzmor.  Executive producer Laura Poitras.

Contact:  info@thelawfilm.com

 

DVD

Released: 2010

Running Time: 96 mins

Awards

Credits

Press

The Oath

Filmed in Yemen and Guantanamo Bay, THE OATH tells the story of Abu Jandal, Osama bin Laden’s former bodyguard, and Salim Hamdan, a prisoner at Guantanamo Bay Prison and the first man to face the controversial military commissions.  

We enter the story in a taxicab in Yemen. Here we meet Abu Jandal, the film’s central protagonist, as he transports passengers through the chaotic streets of Yemen’s capital city, Sana’a. Salim Hamdan is the film’s “ghost” protagonist. His seven-year captivity at Guantanamo is narrated through his prison letters. Following the story of these two men, THE OATH takes the viewer on a journey that leads to Afghanistan, Osama bin Laden, Guantanamo Bay Prison, FBI interrogations, and the U.S. Supreme Court. 

 

Released: 2011 (Video Installation)

Gallery Exhibitions

Ronald Feldman Gallery, Soho NYC
Jan 21 – Feb 5, 2011


Film Society of Lincoln Center, NYC
September 10 & 11, 2011

Blue Sky | Portland, Oregon 
September 1 – October 2, 2011

Atlanta Contemporary Arts Center
October – December 2010 

Credits

Press

O’Say Can You See

Installation and single channel video


O'SAY CAN YOU SEE is composed of images filmed at Ground Zero in September and October 2001, days after the 9/11 attacks.

The soundtrack is composed of the National Anthem recorded in October 2001 at the Yankees' World Series Game 4 in New York. The solo vocal recording of the National Anthem has been looped and deconstructed.  

O'SAY CAN YOU SEE is the prologue to a trilogy of films about post 9/11 America.

 

 

DVD

Released: 2006

Running Time: 90 mins

Awards

Academy Award Nominee, Best Documentary
Independent Spirit Award Nominee, Best Documentary
Emmy Award Nominee
Full Frame, Inspiration Award

Credits

Press

My Country, My Country

Filmed in Baghdad, MY COUNTRY, MY COUNTRY tells the story of Dr. Riyadh, an Iraqi doctor, father of six and Sunni political candidate. An outspoken critic of the U.S. occupation, he is equally passionate about the need to establish democracy in Iraq, arguing that Sunni participation in the January 2005 elections is essential. Yet all around him, Dr. Riyadh sees only chaos, as his waiting room fills each day with patients suffering the physical and mental effects of ever-increasing violence. Dramatically interwoven into the personal journey of Dr. Riyadh is the landscape of the US military occupation, private security contractors, American journalists and the UN officials who orchestrate the elections.

Official Site

DVD

Released: 2003

Running Time: 86 mins

Awards

Peabody Award 
Independent Spirit Award Nominee
Emmy Award Nominee
SXSW, Best Documentary
Center for Documentary Studies Filmmaker Award

Credits

Press

Flag Wars

Set in Columbus, Ohio, FLAG WARS follows what happens when black working-class families are faced with an influx of white gay homebuyers in their neighborhood.  Filmed over four years, FLAG WARS captures the raw emotions of unguarded moments between neighbors: the lesbian realtor who sells the area’s Victorian homes; a new homebuyer who moves to the area to live openly as a gay man; two longtime residents who are in court because of new housing codes; and the judge who hears their cases. From porch conversations and family dinners to public hearings and street protests, FLAG WARS provides a rare and extraordinarily intimate account of the social and human consequences of capitalism and the pursuit of the “American Dream” told through the lives of residents in a community confronted by gentrification.

Directed by Linda Goode Bryant, co-directed by Laura Poitras.